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Give Away: The Travel Project 1000

By on Sep 25, 2012 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

The Travel Project is heading towards that big 1000 in the sky on Twitter, 10’000 page views a month and about to crack into the 1,000,000 most viewed website in the world – a milestone of a small but epic proportions for Nic and I. So we thought we would have a little give away to mark the milestone! So here’s how it works: Anyone who follows us on twitter from follower 900 all the way up to 1000 followers (inclusive) will go in the draw to win a brand new copy of one of my favourite books, “The Wrong Way Home” by Peter Moore. An intrepid tale of one man’s travel adventure in the early 90’s as he crosses overland from London to Sydney.  Simple hey? And if you want to enter twice? Well follow us on Facebook as well and boom, you’re on the way to victory! Now we don’t want to forget our loving followers pre 900 – because let’s face it, we wouldn’t be here today without you awesome people. So we will also be giving away a copy of “No Shitting in the Toilet”  also by Mr Moore to one of our current followers (including our Facebook followers) – Also if you haven’t already done so, enter twice by simply following us on facebook. Thanks everyone for your support! T&Cs Apply, not endorsed by Peter Moore (Just love his books), names will be Randomly Drawn and Winners will be announced here and on our FB and Twitter Pages when we hit 1000 followers.  Good luck!...

Thoughts on India {Preface}

By on Jun 4, 2012 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

If I’m honest with you my faithful readers, its taken me a good four months before I could put pen to paper on Niki and I’s time in India, which we visited at the start of the year for our blog series Search For The Forgotten Tree. With the risk of sounding melodramatic and forgive me as it’s a writers privy to do so; however I needed the time to process my experiences. Experiences that left me questioning the world we live in, the west versus east mentality and an experience that ultimately leads me to being rushed through Kuala Lumpur in the back of an Ambulance with suspected Malaria. However that is a story for another day. So in the end, with this creative sabbatical, my writings and hence the Travel Project took a break. The break was needed so that I could process my thoughts which were consumed with India and to decide how to write about a journey that I have no idea how to explain. To bring you up to date on our happenings. Niki and I ended up spending three weeks in India, two months shorter than we planned. We did a quick tour of Mumbai, Delhi, Jaipur, Pushka and Agra. If you’ve travelled to India before, you can tell straight away that we had tried to see too much in three weeks and you’d be questioning how much we actually saw at all these places. You’d be right to question this as your assumptions would be correct. A lack of planning and budget, led to our travelling plans going askew due to booked out trains, over priced accommodation and trying to travel long distances in a short time frame. We also underestimated the culture shock, something I haven’t experienced since my very first trip to Indonesia over ten years ago. In conclusion, we bit off more than we could chew and our travel plans fell into tatters as we choked on our inability to adapt to India. However, don’t they say (cringe) that the ‘destination is all about the journey’ – well if this is the case, Niki and I walked away with many experiences and a change of attitude in both the way we travel and how we see life. Yet we didn’t walk away feeling happy that we had successfully visited (understood) a destination. We walked away with a big dose of reality and our tail firmly wedged between our legs. A message that says loud and clear, India is not for tourists to come and demand a spiritual holiday from, because you won’t be given one if you do. No, you have to earn it through respect and understanding the culture and the people. India, a juxtaposition of the extremely poor and the incredibly rich all held together by an incredible national pride. With this preface out of the way and an understanding to my readers that the continuing part of the India and Sri Lanka blog won’t be as light-hearted as the first half, my mind now ponders on where I should start this second part of the Search for Forgotten Tree blog series.  If I’m honest and I’m trying to be,  deep down I always knew my India posts would always begin like this and so it seems, I shall start with death… This post is part of the India and Sri Lanka: The Search for the Forgotten Tree blog series. Previous Post I Got Dumped By Mirissa Next Post Coming...

Downtime Apology

By on Nov 1, 2011 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

Hi All! Just a quick note to apologize for the downtime you might of experienced over the last few days – apparently my server decided it wanted to participate in the occupy Melbourne movement. Whilst I’m all up for democracy and social movements, I’ve asked him to give me a little more notice in future! Cheers...

{New Blog Series} India and Sri Lanka: The Search for the Forgotten Tree

By on Oct 25, 2011 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

I could think of no better way to start this exciting post than with something Niki just said to me. “Peter I want you to take note of this quote from my book, “not all activities in India involve hauling your arse up a mountain!” So with that read between the lines message given to me with one eyebrow raised and a look in the eye that says my wife hasn’t forgotten out last foray into Vietnam (Hello, Whats Your Name?), Im very excited to announce our latest travel blog series and of course, our next big travel adventure. In just over three weeks Niki and I will be heading off to fabled island of Sri Lanka for six weeks before landing in the mother country of India for a three month off the beaten track experience and to dig deep into the roots of Niki’s family tree. Our trip is inspired by Niki’s grandparents who migrated from India to Australia in the 1950’s.  Learning recently that Niki’s family has amazing stories of opulent Raj’s, famous Lieutenant-colonel’s of the East India Company as well as survivors’ of shipwreck’s, we hope to trace some of these inspiring and tragic moments in history. Taking the opportunity to visit the places that have lined the photographs of her grandparents walls over their lifetime. Our adventure will be like our own version of Who Do You think You Are? For me, this is a time to consolidate the last three years of studying for my degree. In just a few more weeks this all comes to an end. After nine years of studying on and off, my tourism degree will finally be in my pocket. I don’t know if you heard that, but that was the world’s biggest sigh of relief. I have been pondering  for a while about what should happen next. Should I get a job and start climbing the career ladder? Should I settle down, buy a house, acquire 2.3 kids and have a animal that resembles a dog? Should I torture myself even more and complete my honors? Should I start up an enterprise called bookface plus? Or should I go after a child hood dream of visiting India? In the past when situations have arisen similar to this I have ultimately chosen the road less travelled and somehow I have always ended up exactly where I want to be – happy! When asking Niki what she wants to do next year, she inevitably shouts at me “travel, travel, travel” as she runs out the door to work. So with a clear goal in mind, its time to travel again! One last hoorah of an unadulterated travelling adventure before I settle down for some  career building. Niki and I will be leaving Perth in late November after graduation, travelling from Perth to India via Sri Lanka. We will spend three months experiencing two of the most amazing cultures the world has to offer. We will blog, vlog and photograph our way through these adventures, giving everyone the information needed to do it yourself and hopefully inspire travellers to get off that packaged tour! I’m also really excited about travelling more sustainably and genuinely cant wait to see how different operators around Sri Lanka and India are adopting ethical tourism programs. At the heart of this is the chance for Niki and I to visit destinations that are legendary on the travel circuit as well as pivotal societies of the world we live in. So with that, let the planning begin…   First Post This is Colombo...

Move, Eat, Learn – The Most Inspiring Short Travel Films

By on Oct 14, 2011 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

Move, Eat, Learn In my opinion, three of the most inspiring short travel films to be produced. Don’t forget to show the amazingly talented  Rick Mereki some love on Vimeo for the awesome work!     Which movie is your favorite? Drop us a comment below to tell us...

My Favourite Books To Read Whilst Travelling in South East Asia

By on Aug 2, 2011 in Travel Coloumn | 0 comments

I’m a bit of a book hound and nothing rivals the comfort of a good book whilst stuck in the back of a Bemo traversing through the backwaters of South East Asia. A decent travel book can make the tedious hours of travelling fly by or even distract you from the oncoming truck baring down on you as your crazy driver chats on his phone whilst completing an overtaking maneuver on a blind corner (hello to all my readers out there about to take the road to Sapa!). So with that in mind I wanted to share with you five inspiring books that I have read on the road, that have not only offered me a great read, but also stopped me from losing my marbles in South East Asia. Mr Nice by Howard Marks This great read is a popular book along the South East Asian backpacker route and is often a conversational point of many drinking sessions – is he good or is he bad? This autobiography follows Howard Marks, an Oxford graduate, a successful business man, an English spy and a convicted drug trafficker from the 80’s. His adventures takes him through Thailand, Philippines, Afghanistan, China and India in a time where all you had to do to get off the beaten track was to leave the airport.   The Girl in the Picture by Denise Chong The Story of Kim Phuc is an emotional personal encounter of the Vietnam War. Set in a country ruled by communism, it takes the reader on a journey through history, violence, repression and represents one girls struggle for survival, who subsequently became the subject of one of the most iconic images of the Vietnam War. I read this whilst travelling through Vietnam and can admit to shedding a few tears whilst reading it. The book was able to give me an insight into Vietnamese life over the last 40 years as well as placing many of the  destinations into context. Reading this will change the way you travel through Vietnam!   The Beach by Alex Garland Forget the movie and watching Leonardo DiCaprio getting his freak on on Phi Phi Island; this novel is the real deal. Many travellers will know about this book and if you don’t, you might want to grab hold of it before heading off to Thailand. The Beach follows the notion of a bunch of young travellers finding a secret idyllic place away from “tourists” and trying to keep it all for themselves. Needless to say it all goes terribly wrong! If you’re into Thailand and this whole debate about travellers versus tourists and concept of psuedo travel this book makes for a great read.   The Lonely Planet Story by Tony and Maureen Wheeler Long before Lonely Planet sold up to the BBC (I said sold up not sold out), Tony and Maureen Wheeler set off from the U.K. to Australia on an epic overland adventure. This great book not only follows their highs and lows of travelling through South East Asia, but also takes a look at how they developed the “Yellow Bible” and went onto become the largest guide book publisher in the world. The world isn’t so lonely any more that’s for sure. Warning: Reading this on the road will make you want to start your own publishing company!   The Wrong Way Home by Peter Moore One of my favourite books and writers of all time, The Wrong Way Home follows the adventures of Peter Moore, an Australian who sets off to travel from London to Sydney on $5000 via the legendary 1960’s hippy trail during the early 1990’s. With a mix of humour and a whole lot of luck, Peter avoids being shot in former Yugoslavia, kidnapped in Afghanistan and ends up finding the answer to whether the hippy trail is still alive and kicking?   Do you have any suggestions for a great read? I’m always on the hunt for an exciting new book and I’d love to hear about your favourite travel book (fact or fiction) to read when visiting South East Asia – let me know below. Happy Reading!...